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Outlaws – Thieves – Ghosts – Evil Spirits – Witchcraft Burnings

Mountainside Ghosts

Shepherds have often noticed hauntings in mountain shacks and caves. Among these ghosts is Starkaður from Stóruvöllum in Bárðardal, who died when Starkaðurs rock fell on him at the Gnjúpverja-grazing area and Egill who plunged to his death in Loðmundur and now haunts Landmannahellir (cave).

Nude appearences

In the year of 1853 Guðný, the maid at Ólafsvellir went out to the church to fetch a book for her master. Upon her arrival she saw a farmer from the vicinity, Vigfús Eiríksson of Reykir sitting absolutely naked on the churchbench by the altar. Startled, she looked away, but as she looked back he had disappeared.

Stableghosts

There are many stableghosts in Iceland. Many of them are farmers who have lost their lives in or around stables. One of them is Bryggjudraugurinn at Haukadalur in Biskupstungur, who was said to have been sexually perverted as he would only approach men from behind.

Scientific Ghosts

Medical science gave the opportunity of waking up ghosts in test tubes or beakers. One such ghost is Eyjaselsmóri of Fljótsdalshérað. Tungubrestur of Langanes was also considered a medically produced ghost!

Ghosts in Animal Disguises

Ghosts can appear in all living shapes or forms. Reanimations had it in their nature to transform, and so did Kotslafsi from Rangárvöllir; he would appear as a dog and Ranadraugurinn in Stokkseyri would appear as a grey mare.

Sea Ghosts

Men who lost their lives at sea would appear to their loved ones wet and sad looking. Others who had drowned at sea would turn into vicious and mean ghosts, such as Skipárdraugurinn in Stokkseyri who would attack travelers by the lake.

Móri – The Male Ghost

Icelandic male ghosts are usually called Mórar. The name originates from their clothing, as they wore clothing not unlike the Icelandic poor people centuries ago.

Skotta – The Female Ghost

Icelandic female ghosts are usually called Skotta. The name originates from their clothing as they would wear brownish national costumes with the head dress turned backwards.
Skotta often wears red socks and sucks on her fingers.
Among the most famous Skotta in Iceland is the Mývatnsskotta, Ívars Gunna and Móhúsaskotta.

Talking Skeletons

In the 18th century, the complete skeleton of a woman was found buried next to a new grave in Skálholt. The unusual thing about this skeleton was, that it was perfectly intact. It was placed underneath a bench in the church, but later in the evening some schoolboys challenged a maid servant to go to the church and fetch the skeleton.

Tightwads in Shrouds

Tightwads and several different ghosts that do sometimes rise up from their graves are often seen wearing white shrouds and today ghosts are generally regarded as being white in colour.

Last Tale Of Kampholtsmóri

Once again there’s a tale to tell, and Kampholtsmóri is still around and well…

In the year 2000 a project was scheduled to tear down some old buildings, farms and outhouses in south Iceland that had been abandoned and left in decay. The project was led by only the best, Ræktunarsamband Flóa & Skeiða. Every day for a couple of weeks, the director would meet his staff in the morning and tell them which buildings to tear down that day. The men where startled when they were asked to tear down the old farm Kotið and the following day the old farm Hjáleigan. Then one morning, the director told them to tear down an old farm and outhouse in Kampholt, which had not been used for some thirty years…

Brennivín Ghosts

Brennivín is the original Icelandic Schnapps.

One of many well known at Kolviðarhóll was the Brennivín Ghost. He was said to have been the son of a Danish attendant, at the Sunchenberg store in Reykjavík. His duties lay in keeping count of liquor in store, but was also a liquor lover himself. He used to take horsebackrides to Kolvidarhóll and to Marardalur every summer to quench his thirst for liquor, considering these trips to be his best. This man passed away in his bed in Reykjavík, but the following winter two men from the south of Iceland were riding over the meadow, heading for the shelter on Kolviðarhóll to rest.

Sources: Ghost Center Stokkseyri