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Ingjaldsholl Church

Region: West Iceland
Coordinates: 64.9079374° N 23.8544814° W

This former parsonage and estate, outside the boundaries of the NP, was the common assembly site of the parish in the past. The estate was abandoned in 1966 and is the property of the government. The present church was built in 1903 and is among the oldest concrete churches of the country. When it was built, it received a replica of the altarpiece of the Lutheran Cathedral of Reykjavik.

The older altarpiece, now decorating the Brimilsvalla-church, was a present form Danish merchants in 1709. Both The Book of Settlements and The Bardar Saga mention the settler at Ingjaldsholl, Ingjaldur Alfarinsson. He is said to have had a dispute with the giantess Hetta, who lived in the Ennis-Mountain. She left no stone unturned to harm Ingjaldur. Once she almost managed to drown him when he was catching fish from his boat off the coast. She used sorcery to magnify a storm to bring that about. A friend of Ingjaldur, Bardur Snaefellsas, managed to come to his rescue in time.

Thrandur, who is mentioned in the Eyrbyggja Saga, was the son of Ingjaldur. He was among the strongest men of the country, giant like and ugly until he cast the pagan religion and was baptized. Still another Saga, The Viglundar Saga, mentions a church at Ingjaldsholl in 1317 and a prayer chapel up to that time. In 1477, a foreign vessel arrived at Rif, a nearby harbour, during the summer.

According to legends from the late 15th century, a nobleman on board was no other than Christopher Columbus, who had undertaken this trip to study the journeys of Nordic seafarers to North America. He spent the whole winter to do so.

West Iceland Saga Trail

Links in Ingjaldsholl Church